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22. that is very serious. in the age of technology and the information age, we produce 70% of engineers. china produces 400,000 engineers. you know, this is serious stuff. we're talking about the future and our role in the future. and we need to begin to make adjustments. we need to make them quite soon. we cannot sit around and be enamored of support and entertainment and sports and glitz and glamour. i think we all get it. because we are the pinnacle nation in the world right now. have another pinnacle nation's forests. ancient egypt, greece. clinical nations. number one, no competition. going to be there forever. or so they thought. so what happened to each and every one of them? basically they became enamored with sports and entertainment and lifestyles of the rich and famous. they turned a blind eye to political corruption. they lost their moral compass and went right down the tubes. some will say that actually happened to the united states. but i think an honest assessment would demonstrate that it is already in the process of happening. the real question is can we b
as they continue on the road to technology and on comprehensive immigration reform. to work within the time we have i'm going to dispense with long introductions but let me mention the enterprises. this people has gnltd from europe and she co- founded her company. born in columbia we have alexander he is the do founder of voice bunny and he's a recent father and returned almost right after his little girl was born to the white house to be honored and we'll be hearing about that. and the third narrator is the chief at bright sons. we received his masters in commuter science and other degrees from ucla. join me in welcoming our panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reu
, is this going to be the norm going forward? are there more acquisitions to be done in terms of technology and international? >> we are clearly going to be investing in technology. no doubt about it. now, whether it's acquisitions or our oh own capabilities, i spent monday and tuesday in our office in san bernardino, california, and we have acquired talent, the best talent in the world, the smartest in silicon valley, that i continue to be enthused. so we will invest in different ways in the area of technology. and at the same time, we're going to continue to invest in stores. we think the overlap -- having 11,000 retail stores around the world and the world's best technology -- we think produces the world's best way to serve consumers in every market, so we're going to continue to invest in both in order to serve customers with this overlap of technology and stores. >> you know, it's interesting that you mentioned -- first of all, will you take people from amazon.com? what about the talent there? >> well, we have great respect for all competitors, including amazon and other competitors. a
and water watch, these are anti-technology companies, they are fearful of innovation. all chemicals are bad. pesticides are bad. we have a green revolution that started in the 50s. the reason we have the green revolution is because of genetic modification that has occurred. these organizations really want to stop technology, and the saddest situation -- we have an example that happened just a few weeks ago in the philippines, where vandals really desecrated, vandalized rice problems of golden rice that producer beta carotene that would save about a million lives a year, and it was destroyed by these vandals and supported by green peace and organizations like center for food safety and others who want to stop the technology, because if this technology is actually released, when this is approved, it is going to be a death blow to the carping by these groups that these gmo's are unsafe. they have an anti science, anti-technology, anti-innovation, kind of a right-wing view -- >> patty aren't there lots of benefits to gmo's especially to people in poorer countries. >> we have yet to see that hap
back into the cyclicals, so we're overweight the technology space, overweight financials. so i think the market is setting itself up for a good finish to the year. i still have some more dry powder, but i definitely want to be involved with this market. i think all of the naysayers all year long, i think, have -- are still waiting for that great entry point as we hit new record highs. >> josh, picking up anything on the floor about what traders will be looking forward to next week in order to figure out where we go from here? >> actually, kelly, you have a pretty relatively busy week in terms of economic fronts. you have durable goods. you have home prices. you have consumer confidence. you also have a lot more fed speak. william, lagarde, bullard, and i think traders are probably expecting kind of it to be relatively quiet here, depending on rates. remember, then again, that could change september, then we get the jobs report. of course, there's the fed taper or not tapering, and if they do, by how much. >> last question, ralph, you had said, okay, we get a 10% correction. it won't
world reports. >> reporter: the l-0 uses a technology to race over long distances at superfast speeds. it's called superconducting magnetic levation. officials have just opened a new track for test runs in central japan. it's nearly 43 kilometers long. commercial service isn't scheduled to begin until 2027. once the train is up and running it will take people from tokyo to nagoya in just 40 minutes. one hour less than a bullet train trip. >> translator: i was impressed by the speed and its quietness surprised me. >> translator: the train will make it much easier to get around. i'm excited. >> translator: the l-0 will drastically change japan's economy and society. this technology will help propel japan ahead in the world. >> reporter: engineers first began working on the train nearly half a century ago. they've kept at it ever since. in 2003, a prototype reached 581 kilometers per hour, a record that still stands. special magnets hold the key to the train's speed. the l-0 has superconducting electromagnets along the outside. they make it possible for the train to levitate and raise al
need to stay on this course of putting through these technology-grounded efficiency rules for a whole range of appliances and the like. in fact, on analogies point i would raise a 2001 report from the national academy of sciences that exams d. o. e. fossil and energy efficiency port portfolio in the first twenty years. and concluded that the 22 programs the analyzed which cost about $13 billion total between '78 and 2001 yield the economic benefits of about $40 billion. so a return on investment. i think but an interesting part of the story is the study attributed -- to three efficiency programs that cost $11 million. even relatively small efficiency programs can yield results both in economic benefit and reduction of carbon emission. regoing to be strongly focused on advancing this energy efficiency agenda in multiple do main and certainly our responsibility with rulemaking i will assure you we will maintain strong pressure in this direction. another key provision of the president's climate plan districts epa to issue rules for cutting carbon emissions for new and existing power plan
, when technology breaks down it can be costly. amazon lost millions when its site went offline. nasdaq's shut down brought billions in trading to a complete halt. tonight, cramer's zeroing in on the top plays to keep your portfolio protected. >>> plus, you ask. he answers. >> i'm wondering about susq. susquehanna. >> i got to do the homework. i'm not ready to give you an answer. >> you sent cramer back to the books. now he's got the answers you need. >>> plus, jim responds to your tweets. @jimcramer #mad tweets. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer. #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to madmoney at cnbc.com. or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monit
, and they are reinventing themselves. think ever not just innovation and technology, but look at the lining around the city, shake shack? i mean, that's innovative burger, and people wait an hour to get one. adam: it's greasy though. >> it's good enough to wait an hour in line, but there's forms of innovation, and in the trucking industry -- lori: despite worker regulations on the hours they drive? >> doesn't help, but they have to work around that stuff, and that makes them -- at the end of the day, more competitive. adam: sensing a takeover? >> glad you said that. they have been in the rumor mill on and off for a long time, and hammered in part because of poor excuse, oversold despite the fact it's coming back. feel like they are chasing breakouts, and the new ceo is a woman, i think, the first woman to run the company in a long time. womenning the -- woman of a trucking company. innovation; right? these old-schoolboys from ors, okay, thinking out of the box. i like it. earnings estimates for the fiscal year this year and next year rocket to the upside. wall street expects big things from the company and
just to receive money. brazil is eager to receive investment in technology to create jobs. but it is open to provide loans. the brazilian development bank has very crude conditions to provide loans for companies that want to invest in brazil. that is not a problem, but what we really want is to have investment in brazil to create jobs. i want to be clear about this area. i understand about brazilian policy, about investments in brazil. we really want companies to produce in brazil. why is that? we are really worried about the quality of -- the quality of employment in brazil. that is the reason. >> we will continue in another part of the program. we need to take the first break. i will be right back. >> welcome back to the second part of today's row gram. i am your host. we will continue the conversation with the current deputy director of the commercial office of resilient taipei. might apologize -- my apologies for interrupting you earlier. let us get back to the concept which i am very interested in, the equality of employment in brazil. >> as i explained, sometimes the
center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. i'm, like, totally not down with change. but i had to change to bounce dryer bars. one bar freshens more loads than these two bottles. i am so gonna tell everyone. [ male announcer ] how do you get your bounce? [ woman ] time for change! >> 23 minutes past the hour. hello, everybody. this is your fox news minute. the giant wildfire near yosemite national park grew by several hundred acres overnight, but that is a relatively small increase compared to recent days. it has burned more than 300 acres and containment only at 30%. the obama administration is announcing two new steps on gun control which will not require congressional approval. it will curb the impact of surplus weapons. the ministration proposing a closer loophole allowing certain weapons reregistered to corporations without background checks. gun legislation collapsed in congress earlier this year. good news for some runners, in the field at the boston marathon will be larger ne
nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >>> finger pointing and name calling. that's been the game between the nasdaq and new york stock exchange since last thursday. now the federal government is demanding hard answers. >> the two exchanges are blaming one another for the destruction and now the securities and exchange commission heard enough. its head mary jo white demanding they meet september 12th to give a clear picture of exactly what happened. what's on the line at the meeting and what's the future of these exchanges? with us, david wield, former vice chairman and chris nagy, served on the board of the philadelphia stock exchange and amex option s exchanges. william. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> from your perspective, how important is the nasdaq prove it's not at fault jmplt you c? >> you can look at the structure. both at fault in some way. blaming the markets isn't particularly productive. they've become so complicated, some respects
'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. thanks for joining us.  - coming up, new technology and new moral challenges. - these are questions we need to think about before we have the technologies. so, we have to engage in what i call prophylactic ethics. we need to think about what this means for us. - nasa's paul root wolpe talks mind-reading, cerebral privacy, health in the space station, and more from the cutting edge of bioethics. it's just ahead on "global ethics forum." - today's guest has spent his career examining the ethics underlying tomorrow's scientific breakthroughs. as one of the nation's most prominent bioethicists, paul root wolpe encourages scientists to reconsider not only what they can do, but what they should do. dr. wolpe is the asa griggs candler professor of bioethics and the director of the center for ethics at emory university.
technologically-driven our economy is, especially these high speed trades and, you know, smart grid, et cetera, the more vulnerable are we to potential interruptions. >> now to the regulators, people familiar with the matter tell fox business, commodities future trading commission is looking for new rules for high speed computer changes. sec chairman mary jo white plans to hold a meeting with marketing officials and nasdaq about the marketing freeze. they plan to have new standards and fines for electronic trading networks t would require them to test their systems and design plans for failures. house services and staff there are examining the issue. tracy? tracy: rich edson, thank you very much. adam: for more on yesterday's nasdaq flash freeze and what is means for investors, brian jacobsen, wells fargo fund management. he is the chief portfolio strategist and he joins us now. get back to the question of nasdaq. have they thoroughly explained this to the satisfaction of investors and market participants? >> stock price reaction would suggest they haven't thoroughly explained or people didn't
unveiled a newly developed technology that automatically stops a car from colliding with a bicycle. volvo's system applies the brakes when windshield cameras as well as radar and infrared ray bumper sensors find an object in front is getting dangerously close. the technology works even when a bicycle faulters in the path of a car. systems have trouble detecting fast-moving bicycles, but the company says its swifter imagery analysis by the windshield cameras helps prevent a collision. >> if we look into the data, the national data, we can see that cyclist is one of the top three fatalities in traffic. so that's why volvo now launched the cyclist detection functionality. >> the company plans to price the system at around $2,000. >>> people in china are crowding onto beaches to get some relief from the summer sun. they've been reminded for years to cover up, but these days some women are taking the advice to another level. nhk world's hiroshi hamaguchi explains. >> reporter: this beach is a popular resort spot. on sundays it attracts a couple of hundred thousands people including young group
. the cnbc news line is rick shearling, head of u.s. technology research. he just got off the phone with microsoft. rick, was ballmer forced out? >> jim, it's not exactly clear. you know that value act was pressing and threatening to file a proxy battle. and on their agenda was management succession. so i guess what's unclear right now does this validate that value active getting a board seat and they're already having some effect for might suggest that value act had a harder time winning a board seat, that one of their key items to appeal to investors was was management succession is kind of off the table now. the other items, i think on value act's agenda is the significant repurchase and significant increase in dividend. i think all of that becomes more likely if you have new management in place. but i think right now the key question would be does this probability of getting a board seat or wrath whether they have to go through the proxy concept and whether that's effective. one of their main octobbjective management succession. >> do you think that investors should chase the st
expert review. a panel of experts currently in power to review the impact of technology on security, on privacy, and on foreign policy, then issue its interim report on this technology by october and a final report by december. question, how would you describe president obama's change of position since june when he said, quote unquote, the right balance was struck between privacy and security and his new reform. balance them both out r. the president's views regarding privacy evolving, or is this a massive presidential about turn, a flip-flop? ellen. >> i don't think president obama wanted to be the democratic president that expanded the national security state, and the various disclosures that have come out since he made those initial statements in june saying he was okay with the balance has indicated that the, you know, spying, if you will, on americans is more widespread than we all initially thought. and so i think he's open to reigning this in. those are all reasonable steps you outlined. i imagine congress is looking at a way. but i still think he's not going to back away fro
, in autos and technology, even pop culture. on the economic front, though, the country's emergence from poverty have also been noteworthy. today we're kicking off a week of special reports on the trillion-dollar economy. chloe chao reports on why the export-oriented growth model that has driven so much of south korea's successes now needs to change. >> reporter: this 35-year-old is a wife and mother in a typical working-class family. she quit her job 1 1/2 years ago to care for her three sons, all of whom are under the age of 5. with her husband's income of 6,000 u.s. dollars a month, they're just making ends meet. >> translator: both of us came into this marriage with debts of our own. and because of this, it's not easy. if we started out without any debt, i think we'd be able to save about 50% of what we earn. >> reporter: and it's families like lee es that show the economy. so much so that president park made it one of her first major initiatives. in march she announced a $1.35 billion fund to provide debt relief to korean households. >> there has been a decoupling between the growth
technologies, unites technologies made the acquisition of goodrich. the airspace is on fire in the country. you default to that that's an international market that must be based here. like united technology, it's a smart company. >> street research, not too much this week. the deutsche bank upgrading dollar tree to buy to hold. sales incrementally positive on the dollar stores. you not only follow the stores you manage to get into one or two every weekend. >> i do prefer dollar tree. if you ever bought candy the a cvs or walgreens, you're a sucker. >> is that significant? >> if you buy readers, i can't see a thing, you're playing full praise. you go there, they're a fraction. >> the stock's up so much. what could happen there? >> the board is all up, you've got a standstill expiring or expiring. there's continued chatter, could you see, could you try to force a deal between family dollar and dollar tree. >> dollar tree had good numbers last week. >> dollar general. >> dollar general, frankly a buyback king. they have -- they spin -- >> walmart have any interest? >> walmart? >> i'm not saying an
engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. >>> you are watching "squawk on the street" live from the world's financial market of the world, and this is the third worst day of the nasdaq yesterday, all on better than expect pad volume and people thought that monday's valiolume would be repeated tuesday, but it didn't. >> and you think that the market needed to take advantage of the decline, because nasdaq has been soaring and the same stocks over and over, and tesla, and maybe today, you look at it and tesla is coming up again, and you feel like somebody is going to come out to say, buy, buy, buy, and netflix we had a chartist talking about that and the concentration of w
on a tablet. >> "the wall street journal"'s walt mossberg looks at the future of personal technology in the first of a two-part interview tonight on "the communicators" at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span2. >> in our original series "first ladies: influence and image" we look of the public and private lives of the women who served as first lady strength nation's first 112 years. now is moving to the modern air we will feature the first ladies in their own words. >> the building of human rights would be one of the foundations on which we would build in the world an atmosphere in which peace could roam. >> i don't think the white house completely belongs to one person. it belongs to the people of america. and i think whoever is the first lady should reserve it and enhance the and leave something there. >> season two from edith roosevelt to michelle obama live monday night including your calls, facebook comments and weeks starting september 9 at 9 eastern on c-span. >> tonight we will conclude the encore presentation of season one of our series with first lady ida mckinley. >> and live now to
learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am proud to say that i october of 2010, this effort led to 190 countries signing onto an historic agreement to improve aviation security, standards, and technology and information sharing. i have had the chance to visit many of those countries over the past 4.5 years. continentscross six -- however, our work did not end there. following the 20 10 air cargo threat which involved bombs hidden inside printer cartridges departing on international planes to the united states, we launched a second initiative to work with intern
for work? automation and technology make it so that in fact we need fewer human hands in a bunch of arenas where we used to so that means we have to think about work quite differently and about the society needs for the contribution. and i think that we will have our best chance at getting to some of those changes if we have a really fully multiracial, multi justice movement and that is explicit about race and the way that gordon has mentioned that engages everybody that has a stake in taking their racial order a part. the changing demographics of america present such an opportunity for us. we are coming into a period that we can redefine what it means to be american because for too long that has been a title that has been captured and owned by white folks. and many of us that have been here for 200, 300 years, since the very beginning since before there were white folks, you know, it really is not feeling like we were american. we were the other. so we are in a moment where we are getting ready to actually calotte back and own what it means to be american and i think from that will come a
, it is not a downer. >> although on the technologies we saw yesterday reported by the journal 660% of the ipos here have been tech-related which is not a reflection of a great deal of excitement. >> well, i bridle at that, because i think that biotech should be considered tech, and b biotech is the hottest year i can remember. a lot of the biotech companies came public and found people suspicious saying that people will buy anything. >> we are not there yet. >> no? >> really? the ipos that we have looked at, it does not appear that the quality of them has diminished anywhere near the level that we saw where you could put zseven sentences on paper and then open up public. >> and the perkulation of the stocks, and if you want to see some group dole we well, and tht of bristol-myers -- >> we mentioned that the nasdaq was positive on the month and it just went negative, so we did jinx that. over to bob pisani on the floor. >> oil is up at a six-month high, and chevron and exxon up, but 28 other stocks to the dow are to the downside. rough seas over in the emerging markets, and indian and philippine and
of the reasons why. the analysts are saying voice technology is becoming a critical part that users are going to come to expect in the future in their wearable devices and their apple devices. but even going beyond apple, they're saying that you have to look at voice cancellation and voice recognition technology. this is a new market. so these shares are up sharply and with that, of course, we're also watching apple shares which at last check were up a little bit as well. cheryl: all right. thank you very much, lauren simonetti, for the new york stock exchange. a lot of breaking news. closing bell's going to be ringing, we've got 49 minutes to go, and media companies like "the new york times" under fire from hack aers who support -- hackers who support the syrian president. coming up next, what, if anything, can be done to stop cyber attacks on media web sites? >>> and as the u.s. prepares for possible missile strikes from syria, we're going to look at the dangers of a much bigger conflict and the potential risk to world markets. a global market strategist and a former cia officer going to gi
. she says the halt was serious and she reinforce our collective commitment to addressing technological vulnerabilities of exchanges. former s.e.c. chief harvey pitt weighed in on cnbc's "kudlow report." >> this should not have happened. and the inability to tell people which securities would trade and which were opening ahead of others, that's pure chaos and it is wholly unacceptable. >> nasdaq chairman and ceo will be on u.s. "squawk box" today on a first on cnbc interview. that's at 7:30 a.m. eastern. head to our website to find out what is next for nasdaq. a number of analysts say the stock exchange's credibility is likely to bare the brunt of the fallout with the implications limited for broader trading and u.s. stocks, all on cnbc.com. >>> the nasdaq flash freeze is the latest in a stripg ng of trading snafus in recent years. the flash crash in 2010, that botched that ipo, the fake ap tweet and the erroneous trades earlier this week from goldman sachs all raised questions about whether market participants are comfortable with the risk computer glitches can cause to markets. do you
's why we partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >>> welcome back. it's time now for the "executive edge," our daily segment focused on giving business leaders a leg up. and you know, we're approaching the five-year anniversary of the financial crisis and the government response coming up, about two weeks. if you think the collapse of lehman is that anniversary. in my "the new york times" column this morning, we looked at t.a.r.p. and i talked to hank paulsen about his misgivings about bank bonuses. he rarely talked about this before, and speaking about the payouts, paulsen noted in part -- "to say i was disappointed is an understatement. my view has nothing to do with legality and everything to do with what was right and everything to do with just a colossal lack of self-awareness to how they were viewed by the american public." and you know, guys, hank paulson has not come out and talked about the bonuses in a f
breached itself with technology used in the xbox game console. did you see what david pogue wrote about ballmer? i thought it was insightful. >> i thought it was critical. everything over the last 13 years. >> i looked at it and looked at net income and number of employees and revenue and everything eliminatise. the one thing that stuck out, obviously, was that the stock was still down from where it was in 2000, but that's the same with any -- it's a $6 billion market cap. that was the blue chip sort of mania that put coke at 50 times earnings and general electric at $60 a share and all of these stocks were way overbought and overloved in the late '90s. you look at just how he managed the business itself. it is a -- what do they make? what do they do in revenue? what do they make per year? i think two or three times what they used to make when it was a $600 million company. i don't know. they provided software for pcs. they battled the open -- like linux, whatever, they sort of prevailed there. >> the question is what's going to happen with the company in the next ten years? to me, give
that the stocks as a group, mandy, are part of the prior cycle leadership and rather be in industrials, technology and financials in the states relative to global precious metals at these levels. >> are you among those that keep a portion of a portfolio in gold anyway as a hedge? 5% or whatever? >> well, we do for some of our blended portfolios, bill, when we take a look at holdings both in canada, in the united states. but our u.s. portfolios we look at are benchmarked toward the u.s. and what we want to do is be cautious here in the materials space given where fundamentals are. 2% or 3% position is prudent in the u.s. at these levels. >> can i follow up on what you were saying about industrials, brian? you know, a lot of industrials, you know, they have assets in various geographies around the world and in light of the fact of seeing stabilizations in the regions, brian, do you feel that that hasn't yet been priced in yet and could be part of the upside you see? >> it's an excellent point, mandy. i think the big thing on industrials are investors over ten years used industrials for the increment
some parties, you know some of them going on and talking is not enough. we need to think of technology cyber bullying because that's made its worse hasn't it. >> it's also you see i was having lunch here in san francisco yesterday and everyone in the restaurant was texting, nobody was talking to each other. so if we do this as adults, come on, what are we teaching them. >> what are the signs that your child is a bully. >> the first thing is lashing out. lash out and hope -- >> the same as the person who was being bullied. the person who is bullying is doing some of that same behavior at home. >> a bully -- i do not believe that bully is truly a popular child in school. it is only popular at the moment that it has the momentum, you know, with those little balls. >> oh, yes. >> think of newton's cradle, you hit the first prealternative strike, right, the whole group reacts since school and that's what's funny, you continue because there's momentum. >> nobody wants to stand out and be part and say, you know, you're wrong they're afraid they're going to get bullied themselves. >> my advice
the clutch, you go from what is technologically possible to what is politically feasible. the problem hasn't been that it is not technologically possible, it is just politically not feasible. a couple of things have happened. one is the attempt to shift gets frustrated. you need only look at some pretty good initiatives that have gone to congress and have been almost dead on arrival. the second is you have another driver, the fed, which has been trying to force change but haven't been able to do it using proper instruments. that is why the benefits have been less than what were expected and the cost or the collateral damage has become a concern. >> where do we go from here? >> let me tell you what should happen. it is important to make the difference between that and what is likely to happen. what should happen is you should have a political coming together on the four things this economy needs. the problem is that the political debate is very -- right now. we need structural reforms. we need more balanced aggregate demand. we need to deal with debt overhang and persistent behavior that un
in the rise of the personal computer which happens in the 1979, 1980 country. did you see technology as playing a role, even backstage there, the hints of this new order that would come in these stories transferred absolutely. absolutely the rise of telecommunications issues of import. ayatollah khomeini was an ex-offer much o of the iranian revolution in the communicate with his supporters through the state-of-the-art telephone switching system that had been installed by the americans for the show. he could call of anybody anywhere in iran and it was usually important for the iranian revolution. with the help of satellites of course which were, the cost to come down. satellite communications were very important. i think you'd see a lot of different levels in which the technology was influencing all this. pcs were not yet there, but i think they are very much a part of this moment. the technological aspect really deserves to be going into a lot more deeply than i was able to. >> host: tell me if you were to do a follow-up to the book, would you jump right in with 1980, or what is you
we have a text in epidemic. how can we use the recent sensors and mapping and technologies that are available in robotics to have the car drive itself? that is moonshot thinking. maybe you can't get their right away. you have a mercury mission and then jim and i and apollo. it's about a year. this is the prototype, isabel for the glass designer. by the way for the prototype, the first prototype they built they did it not in a month but a year-and-a-half they put it together. why couldn't school be like that, but set apart and do the design thinking then we start projects and businesses? we think 10x better, not 10%. when we are working with something two-thirds what can i do to move forward in what is the critique? a third, yes. this is a place we just wanted people to celebrate moonshot thinking. also looking more historical yet who already made it but let's celebrate the people taking decrease the risk. hear the proposals and help them to try to move the world for word and moonshot radical proposals. last i guess i would end on - it's so important to help kids find their
it and i say to all people, surely in the world war with no technology, no more than 40 monuments officers ever in italy, about 100 northern europe, if we can do the job we did then, we can certainly do a better job today, and that is why in 2007 i did found at the monuments been foundation for the preservation of art, and i would like to share with you a few minutes about the initial years of our work. ♪ ♪ >> the vision and leadership of western outlet leaders coming particular general eisenhower, made the protection of artistic and cultural treasures a priority and the return of stolen property and violence. the monuments been implemented and defected of that policy. their legacy is rich and filled with incredible examples of how to protect cultural treasures from armed conflict. but their legacy has been all but lost. we as a nation paid a high price for not having preserved and utilized that legacy. time is running out. for that reason i am announcing today the creation of the monuments men foundation for the preservation of art. its mission is to preserve the legacy of the unprece
of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." american airlines, us airways and the justice department are all now saying they're open to settling the case which pits the doj against the proposed merger of the two airlines. joining us to discuss it, kevin stark, senior analyst at crg capital group. good morning to you. i don't know what to think of this. how is it possible that everybody -- i understand why american and usair would be open to a settlement, i don't understand how the doj comes out with this big case, they say the whole thing is horrific and horrible for everybody and now they say, maybe we'll settle? >> i think if you read the court docket, it says they're open to a settlement, but in reality they're not listening to each other. so really -- >> there is a lot of smoke
life and the transplant surgerying with the whole body of technology and development of medicine, cleats cholesterol, we tell that story through my case and laid against the background of my time in public service. and i was uniquely blessed in many respects, obviously, you can never express enough gratitude for a donor or the donor's family. you cannot talk about what i went through and i survived it what without talking about liz, her sister, and my wife. we celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next week. [applause] i -- when you go through everything we went through as a family, and the only way to go through it is as a family, if at all possible. i wake up every morning with a smile on my face thankful for a new day i never expected to see. and basically what the book is about, it's simon and shuster love it. it's called heart, american medical odyssey. i think it's a pretty good book. it's not political. it has nothing to do with politics. i suppose you could say that all of pry my critics say i never had a heart. [laughter] may want to have that problem -- this challenge
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